Tag Archives: Pull Tabs

House committee shoots down expanded gaming research bill

From the Michigan HBPA website

COMMITTEE SAYS NO: House Appropriations Committee Chair, Representative Cushingberry on Tues. Oct. 13th did not get the support from the committee to move HB 5012 to the floor for a vote. HB 5012 approved a study of Pull Tabs and Instant Racing (archived races). There was opposition from Greek Town Casino and other groups. Representative Simpson of Jackson has taken on the challenge of Pull Tabs and Instant Racing, a plan is expected to separate the the two and attempt on an individual basis.

Not much else has been reported on the subject, but if anything comes out, you know where to find it.

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Executive order dissolves Office of Racing Commissioner

The Michigan News reports Gov. Jennifer Granholm signed an executive order yesterday, combining several existing state departments into the new Department of Natural Resources and Environment.

In the same order, Granholm abolished Michigan’s Office of Racing Commissioner, and consolidated horse racing activities into the Michigan Gaming Control Board. The board’s executive director, Richard S. Kalm, will “perform the functions of Racing Commissioner.”

In other news out of Lansing, WXYZ – Channel 7 in Detroit reports the state’s House Appropriations Committee may soon vote to spend $20,000 to study expanded gaming options at Michigan’s racetracks to increase revenues. The two options under consideration are instant racing and electronic pull tab machines. The report notes any adopted plan will likely be met with lawsuits.

Right now, I am on a complementary one-hour wi-fi connection in a Lexington, KY McDonald’s, so this post has to be short and sweet. Expect more information as it becomes available and my connection improves.

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Positive signs?

Who knew all Michigan racing needed to get Lansing on its side with alternative wagering was a major economic collapse and a budget deficit the size of Montana?

The Michigan HBPA website reports…

PULL TABS AT RACE TRACKS: As the state scrambles to complete the budget process for 2009-10, discussions have centered around allowing tracks to offer  “lottery pull tab” machines to generate needed state revenue and assist the tracks in the challenge to stay in business. The MI-HBPA has supported for years additional gaming at the race tracks and are very interested in working with Lansing to develop a comprehensive plan for additional gaming. As expected, the “pull tab” proposal must follow the requirements set in the passage of Prop 1 in 2004. Pull tabs, as well as, VLT’s will need local and statewide approval.


The MI-HBPA is currently working on proposals for VLT’s and internet account wagering (ADW’s) on horse racing to assist in saving our industry. As the challenges grow with the approval for VLT’s in Ohio to maintain our horse population, we look forward to working with Lansing to get it right. Serious efforts need to be coordinated to develop a comprehensive package to generate state revenue and the needed revenue to save the racing industry.


A comprehensive plan will offer the state millions and save an industry with a 76 year history of being a producer without the need for state subsidies. The racing industry is willing to work with the state to support a much higher take than currently offered by the casinos throughout the state, at least double. The MI-HBPA is committed to working with all parties in developing a fair plan for all as we face extinction.


Additional gaming that belongs in a comprehensive plan:

1) VLT’s at all race tracks as Ohio, Penn, Indiana and West Virginia

2) Advanced Deposit Wagering (ADW’s) internet wagering on horse racing in Michigan currently is projected to be 60 million dollars, money leaving the state to wager on horse racing and the state, horsemen and tracks gain -0- from the activity, because wagering on the internet in Michigan on horse racing is illegal. So, it goes on with no controls, no revenue and continues to grow nationally. One ADW company in Michigan has enjoyed over a 50% gain in the first quarter of 2009 while our simulcasting wagering is in a nose dive and industry all but gone.

3) Intstant Racing machines to allow wagering on archived races.


Basically, with the race tracks involved in the gaming business, they should be allowed to compete fairly for the gaming dollar and offer any game that any competitor offers. Competition is good for the consumer.

While Pull Tabs would certainly be a welcome addition to Michigan’s racetracks, hopefully the state does not see them as a way to appease the industry and stop there. Pull Tabs are indeed very entertaining. I myself am a frequent player when I visit my local bars and dining establishments. However, Pull Tabs must be seen as a first step toward bigger and better things, not an ultimate solution. Pull Tabs are more of an impulse item, while casino-style gaming is a destination. Still, anything to boost the purse structure will be greeted with open arms.

One thing that strikes me as odd about the push for Pull Tabs is it appears the tracks must adhere to the demands of Proposal 1 to install the machines. However, if my memory serves me correctly, the Pull Tab machines in my local establishments were installed well after the 2004 election without any kind of electoral hubbub. Proposal 1 was written to stop Racinos, but I was under the impression it applied to everyone not granted immunity by its language. Surely the racing interests have people on their side better versed in the intricacies of Prop 1 than myself, but if the Double 6 bar in McBride, Michigan can get Pull Tabs without anyone raising a fuss, there is little reason to treat racetracks differently.

In related news, it appears Gov. Jennifer Granholm is (finally) on board with the possibility of implementing alternative wagering. Granholm was on WWJ Newsradio 950 Thursday to discuss placing an expanded gaming issue on a future ballot to help preserve the state’s education programs, namely scholarships for college students and laid off workers returning to school. The interview and a small write-up can be found here.

While having the governor publicly support the cause for expanded gaming is definitely a big positive for the movement, forgive me if I take a “wait and see” approach to her statements. Granholm’s track record with the racing industry has been less than stellar during her time in the executive position, most recently shooting down a bill to help restore supplemental funds to Michigan’s horsemen. Cuts like these would have been much easier to swallow if the governor had shown the same openness to expanded gaming then as she is now.

Until the talk turns into action, I approach all of these developments with cautious optimism.

For additional coverage on Gov. Granholm’s newfound support of racinos, a WLNS Channel 6 feature focusing on Sports Creek Raceway can be found here. The link to the video is in the upper left hand corner.

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